NATIONAL GUIDELINES FOR NURSING DELEGATION

Download 1 Apr 2016 ... MEDLINE to search for current articles published in the United. States on nursing delegation from 2010 to September 2015. Th...

0 downloads 300 Views 127KB Size
Continuing Education

National Guidelines for Nursing Delegation National Council of State Boards of Nursing In early 2015, the National Council of State Boards of Nursing convened two panels of experts representing education, research, and practice. The goal was to develop national guidelines based on current research and literature to facilitate and standardize the nursing delegation process. These guidelines provide direction for employers, nurse leaders, staff nurses, and delegatees.

Keywords: Delegation, evidence-based, guidelines, nursing assignment, regulation, research

Objectives ⦁



Understand evidence-based, state-of-the-art standards for delegation. Explain the differences between assignment and delegation and the responsibilities of the employer, nurse leader, delegating nurse, and delegatee in the process of delegation.

H

ealth care is continuously changing and this includes the roles and responsibilities of licensed health care providers and assistive personnel. The number of licensed nurses (i.e., advanced practice registered nurses [APRNs], registered nurses [RNs], or licensed practical nurse/ vocational nurses [LPN/VNs]) may be limited in certain regions and/or institutions. Therefore, care may need to extend beyond the traditional role and assignments of RNs, LPN/VNs, and unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP). When certain aspects of nursing care need to be delegated beyond the traditional role and assignments of a care provider, it is imperative that the delegation process and the state nurse practice act (NPA) be clearly understood so that it is safely and effectively carried out. The delegation process is multifaceted. It begins with decisions made at the administrative level of the organization and extends to the staff responsible for delegating, overseeing the process, and performing the responsibilities. It involves effective communication, empowering staff to make decisions based on their judgment and support from all levels of the health care setting. The employer/nurse leader, individual licensed nurse, and delegatee all have specific responsibilities within the delegation process. (See Figure 1.) It is crucial to understand that states/jurisdictions have different laws and rules/regulations about delegation, and it is the responsibility of all licensed nurses to know what is permitted in their state NPA, rules/regulations, and policies. In early 2015, the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) convened two panels of experts representing Volume 7/Issue 1 April 2016

education, research, and practice to discuss the literature and key issues, and evaluate findings from delegation research funded through NCSBN’s Center for Regulatory Excellence Grant Program. The goal was the development of national guidelines to facilitate and standardize the nursing delegation process. They build on previous work by NCSBN and the American Nurses Association, and provide clarification on the responsibilities associated with delegation. Additionally, these guidelines are meant to address delegation with respect to the various levels of nursing licensure (i.e., APRN, RN, and LPN/VN, where the state NPA allows).

Delegation Versus Assignment Delegation has been a source of significant debate for many years and includes many philosophical discussions over the differences between assignment and delegation. Much of the literature surrounding nursing delegation has focused on the nursing home setting. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) requires nursing homes to employ certified nursing assistants or aides (CNAs) as part of a mechanism to ensure higher standards of care. Through this mechanism, CMS supports federal regulations concerning CNA training and competency, which were established by the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1987. These regulations require nursing homes to employ CNAs who complete state-approved CNA programs, outline the fundamental skills that should be included in all CNA programs, and require the CNA to pass a competency evaluation administered and evaluated only by the state or by a state-approved entity and be added to the state registry. The interpretation of these guidelines by the nursing practice community has likely led to some confusion about what activities, skills, or procedures can be delegated to CNAs. The regulations define the minimum curriculum to be included in a CNA program but do not necessarily define all the activities, skills, or procedures that can www.journalofnursingregulation.com

5

FIGURE 1

Delegation Model

⦁ ⦁ ⦁ ⦁ ⦁

Employer/Nurse Leader Responsibilities Identify a nurse leader Determine nursing responsibilities that can be delegated, to whom, and in what circumstances Develop delegation policies and procedures Periodically evaluate delegation process Promote positive culture/work environment

Communicate information about delegation process and delegatee compePublic tence level Protection Licensed Nurse Responsibilities ⦁ Determine patient needs and when to delegate Two-way ⦁ Ensure availability to delegatee Communication ⦁ Evaluate outcomes of and maintain accountability for delegated responsibility

be performed by a CNA. It is likely that nursing practice has understood these regulations to mean that CNAs can only perform those activities, skills, or procedures that were learned in the basic state-approved CNA training program. CMS defers to state requirements for what CNAs are allowed to perform (Sheila Blackstock, personal communication, December 7, 2015). When performing a fundamental skill on the job, the delegatee is considered to be carrying out an assignment. Delegation is allowing a delegatee to perform a specific nursing activity, skill, or procedure that is beyond the delegatee’s traditional role and not routinely performed. This applies to licensed nurses as well as UAP. Regardless of the current role of the delegatee (RN, LPN/ VN, or UAP), delegation can be summarized as follows: ⦁ A delegatee is allowed to perform a specific nursing activity, skill, or procedure that is outside the traditional role and basic responsibilities of the delegatee’s current job. ⦁ The delegatee has obtained the additional education and training, and validated competence to perform the care/delegated responsibility. The context and processes associated with competency validation will be different for each activity, skill, or procedure being delegated. Competency validation should be specific to the knowledge and skill needed to safely perform the delegated responsibility as well as to the level of practitioner (i.e., RN, LPN/VN, UAP) to whom the activity, skill, or procedure has been delegated.

6

Journal of Nursing Regulation

Training and Education Delegatee Responsibilities Accept activities based on own competence level ⦁ Maintain competence for delegated responsibility ⦁ Maintain accountability for delegated activity ⦁

The licensed nurse who delegates the “responsibility” maintains overall accountability for the patient. However, the delegatee bears the responsibility for the delegated activity, skill, or procedure. ⦁ The licensed nurse cannot delegate nursing judgment or any activity that will involve nursing judgment or critical decision making. ⦁ Nursing responsibilities are delegated by someone who has the authority to delegate. ⦁ The delegated responsibility is within the delegator’s scope of practice. ⦁ When delegating to a licensed nurse, the delegated responsibility must be within the parameters of the delegatee’s authorized scope of practice under the NPA. Regardless of how the state/jurisdiction defines delegation as compared to assignment, appropriate delegation allows for the transition of a responsibility in a safe and consistent manner. The licensed nurse transfers the performance of an activity, skill, or procedure to a delegatee. However, the practice pervasive functions of clinical reasoning, nursing judgment, or critical decision making cannot be delegated. Delegation should not be confused with assignment. Assignment is defined as follows: ⦁ The routine care, activities, and procedures that are within the authorized scope of practice of the RN or LPN/VN or part of the routine functions of the UAP ⦁

The above are included in the coursework taught in the delegatee’s basic educational program. A licensed nurse is still responsible for ensuring an assignment given to a delegatee is carried out completely and correctly. An example of assignment is an LPN/VN caring for a diabetic patient. He or she takes vital signs, checks the blood sugar level using a blood glucose meter, monitors input and output, documents the information, and reports data to the RN. This is considered an “assignment” because these functions are taught in the LPN/VN program and are part of the LPN/VN scope of practice. One exception to these definitions pertains to advanced UAP roles. Skills once believed exclusive to the RN and LPN/ VN role are now taught in certain advanced UAP programs. In a basic course, examples of this include: ⦁ Certified medication aides taught to pass out medications ⦁ Certified medical assistants taught to give injections. Even if taught in a basic education program, when the activity requires a significant level of skill and knowledge, such as administering medications or injections, it is advised that employers/nurse leaders regard these procedures as being delegated and validate competency. For example, an APRN works with a certified medical assistant (CMA) in a physician’s office. The CMA has been taught to give injections in his or her basic coursework and administering injections is part of the CMA role; however, due to the skill and knowledge required and the potential risk to patient safety if not done correctly, the APRN considers injections a delegated responsibility. While additional coursework may not be necessary, competency validation is required. In this scenario, prior to delegating injections, the APRN observes the CMA drawing up medication and administering an injection on different types of patients. Once the APRN is comfortable that the CMA is competent to perform the procedure, it can be routinely delegated to him or her. ⦁

Additional Key Definitions

Accountability: “To be answerable to oneself and others for one’s own choices, decisions and actions as measured against a standard…” (American Nurses Association, 2015, p. 41) Delegated Responsibility: A nursing activity, skill, or procedure that is transferred from a licensed nurse to a delegatee. Delegatee: One who is delegated a nursing responsibility by either an APRN, RN, or LPN/VN (where state NPA allows), is competent to perform it, and verbally accepts the responsibility. A delegatee may be an RN, LPN/VN, or UAP. Delegator: One who delegates a nursing responsibility. A delegator may be an APRN, RN, or LPN/VN (where state NPA allows). Licensed Nurse: A licensed nurse includes APRNs, RNs and LPN/VNs. In some states/jurisdictions, LPN/VNs may be allowed to delegate. Volume 7/Issue 1 April 2016

UAP: Any unlicensed personnel trained to function in a supportive role, regardless of title, to whom a nursing responsibility may be delegated. This includes but is not limited to CNAs, patient care technicians, CMAs, certified medication aides, and home health aides.

Literature Review A review of the literature was conducted in CINAHL and MEDLINE to search for current articles published in the United States on nursing delegation from 2010 to September 2015. The published evidence surrounding delegation is limited, although communication or the collaborative relationship between the licensed nurse and the UAP and scope of practice or scope of employment/function (in the case of the UAP) were primary themes of the published literature. Evidence shows that the better the communication and collaborative relationship between the nurse and the delegatee, the more optimal the outcome of the delegation process (Anthony & Vidal, 2010; Bittner & Gravlin, 2009; Corazzini, Anderson, Mueller, Hunt-McKinney et al., 2013; Damgaard & Young, 2014; Gravlin & Bittner, 2010; Kalisch, 2011; Saccomano & Pinto-Zipp, 2011; Young & Damgaard, 2015). In Gravlin and Bittner’s (2010) descriptive, exploratory study, they 1) measured RNs’ and nurse assistants’ (NAs) reports of missed nursing care and reasons for missed care, 2) identified RNs’ and NAs’ reports of factors related to successful delegation, and 3) described the nurse managers’ reports of missed care. They found that communication between an RN and an NA contributes to effective delegation. Similarly, the literature suggests that a collaborative relationship between the licensed nurse and the UAP influences the effectiveness of delegation and promotes positive patient outcomes (Bittner & Gravlin, 2009; Corazzini, Anderson, Mueller, Hunt-McKinney et al., 2013; Saccomano & Pinto-Zipp, 2011). Bittner and Gravlin (2009) found in their study that nurturing a work relationship based on trust and respect is necessary for effective teamwork and therefore effective delegation. Additionally, evidence also demonstrates that the UAP’s level of competence and knowledge impacts effective delegation (Damgaard & Young, 2014; Gravlin & Bittner, 2010; Young & Damgaard, 2015). Damgaard and Young (2014) and Young and Damgaard (2015) evaluated a nursing care model that included partnering trained UAP at a school with RNs via telehealth technology. The UAP consisted of teachers, school administrators, and administrative assistants who agreed to assist in the management of the children with diabetes. The American Diabetes Association’s (ADA) standardized curriculum, Diabetes Care Tasks at School: What Key Personnel Need to Know (ADA, 2008), was used to train the UAP. Damgaard and Young found that this model was an effective method of delegating diabetes nursing care tasks to UAP. Although this research supports how www.journalofnursingregulation.com

7

TABLE 1

Five Rights of Delegation Right task ⦁ The activity falls within the delegatee’s job description or is included as part of the established written policies and procedures of the nursing practice setting. The facility needs to ensure the policies and procedures describe the expectations and limits of the activity and provide any necessary competency training. Right circumstance The health condition of the patient must be stable. If the patient’s condition changes, the delegatee must communicate this to the licensed nurse, and the licensed nurse must reassess the situation and the appropriateness of the delegation.



Right person The licensed nurse along with the employer and the delegatee is responsible for ensuring that the delegatee possesses the appropriate skills and knowledge to perform the activity.



Right directions and communication Each delegation situation should be specific to the patient, the licensed nurse, and the delegatee. ⦁ The licensed nurse is expected to communicate specific instructions for the delegated activity to the delegatee; the delegatee, as part of two-way communication, should ask any clarifying questions. This communication includes any data that need to be collected, the method for collecting the data, the time frame for reporting the results to the licensed nurse, and additional information pertinent to the situation. ⦁ The delegatee must understand the terms of the delegation and must agree to accept the delegated activity. ⦁ The licensed nurse should ensure that the delegatee understands that she or he cannot make any decisions or modifications in carrying out the activity without first consulting the licensed nurse. ⦁

Right supervision and evaluation The licensed nurse is responsible for monitoring the delegated activity, following up with the delegatee at the completion of the activity, and evaluating patient outcomes. The delegatee is responsible for communicating patient information to the licensed nurse during the delegation situation. The licensed nurse should be ready and available to intervene as necessary. ⦁ The licensed nurse should ensure appropriate documentation of the activity is completed. ⦁

Source: National Council of State Boards of Nursing. (1995, 1996).

8

Journal of Nursing Regulation

the UAP’s level of competence impacts effective delegation, further research may include evaluating the impact of the licensed nurse’s competence on effective delegation. Another prominent theme in the delegation literature involves the effect role confusion has on delegation (Bittner & Gravlin, 2009; Kalisch, 2011). In relation to this, variation exists among states/jurisdictions surrounding scope of practice related to delegation across both the RN and LPN/VN licensure levels (Corazzini et al., 2010; Corazzini et al, 2011; Corazzini, Anderson, Mueller, Hunt-McKinney et al., 2013; Corazzini, Anderson, Mueller, Thorpe, & McConnell, 2013; Mueller, Anderson, McConnell, & Corazzini, 2012; Mueller & Vogelsmeier, 2013). This variation in NPAs and administrative codes promotes confusion among LPN/VNs related to their scope of practice surrounding delegation and supervision (Corazzini, Anderson, Mueller, Thorpe, & McConnell, 2013; Mueller et al., 2012). At times in the long-term care (LTC) setting, RN and LPN licensure levels are not delineated (Corazzini, Anderson, Mueller, Hunt-McKinney et al., 2013). Corazzini et al. (2010) reported that a lack of RNs in LTC clinical leadership sometimes thrusts LPNs into leadership roles in which they are responsible for delegation that extends beyond their scope of practice. Inadequate staffing mix and lack of staff engagement can subsequently have a negative effect on the RN and LPN collaborative relationship (Corazzini, Anderson, Mueller, Hunt-McKinney et al., 2013). Variation in scope of practice or scope of employment/ function across states has also been identified with the CNA role (McMullen et al., 2015). This same variation was also found with the roles and responsibilities of other UAP (Budden, 2011; Jenkins & Joyner, 2013; Mitty et al., 2010). Additionally, Jenkins and Joyner (2013) found variation across acute-care hospitals in the Washington, DC, metropolitan area in what activities UAP were allowed to perform, ranging from basic nursing care functions (including personal hygiene) to special skills, which fall outside the traditional UAP duties. In summary, the evidence demonstrates that successful delegation is influenced by various factors, including effective communication, collaborative work relationship, level of competence and knowledge of the UAP, and role clarity.

Guidelines for Delegation Purpose: To provide clear direction and standardization of the delegation process, from a system (employer) and patient care perspective, for safe delegation of nursing responsibilities. Intended Users: Include, but are not limited to: BONs, health care facilities, community-based settings, professional associations, nurse educators, licensed nurses, and UAP. When using these delegation guidelines, it is important to understand that states/jurisdictions have different laws and rules/regulations about delegation, and it is the responsibility of all licensed nurses to know what is permitted in their state NPA, rules/regulations, and policies. These guidelines can be applied to: ⦁ APRNs when delegating to RNs, LPN/VNs, and UAP ⦁ RNs when delegating to LPN/VNs and UAP ⦁ LPN/VNs (as allowed by their state/jurisdiction) when delegating to UAP. These guidelines do not apply to the transfer of responsibility for care of a patient between licensed health care providers (e.g., RN to another RN or LPN/VN to another LPN/VN), which is considered a handoff (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 2015). Employer/Nurse Leader Responsibilities

1. The employer must identify a nurse leader responsible for oversight of delegated responsibilities for the facility. If there is only one licensed nurse within the practice setting, that licensed nurse must be responsible for oversight of delegated responsibilities for the facility. Rationale: The nurse leader has the ability to assess the needs of the facility, understand the type of knowledge and skill needed to perform a specific nursing responsibility, and be accountable for maintaining a safe environment for patients. He or she is also aware of the knowledge, skill level, and limitations of the licensed nurses and UAP. Additionally, the nurse leader is positioned to develop appropriate staffing models that take into consideration the need for delegation. Therefore, the decision to delegate begins with a thorough assessment by a nurse leader designated by the institution to oversee the process. 2. The designated nurse leader responsible for delegation, ideally with a committee (consisting of other nurse leaders) formed for the purposes of addressing delegation, must determine which nursing responsibilities may be delegated, to whom, and under what circumstances. The nurse leader must be aware of the state/jurisdiction’s NPA and the laws/rules and regulations that affect the delegation process and ensure all institution policies are in accordance with the law. Rationale: A systematic approach to the delegation process fosters communication and consistency of the process throughout the facility. 3. Policies and procedures for delegation must be developed. The employer/nurse leader must outline specific responsibilities that can be delegated and to whom these responsibilities can be delegated. The policies and procedures should also indicate what may not be delegated. The employer must periodically review the policies and procedures for delegation to ensure they remain consistent with current nursing practice trends and that they are consistent with the state/jurisdiction’s NPA (institution/employer policies can be more restrictive, but not less restrictive). Rationale: Policies and procedures standardize the appropriate method of care and ensure safe practices. Having a policy and procedure specific to delegation and delegated responsibilities eliminates questions from licensed nurses and UAP about what can be delegated and how they should be performed. 4. The employer/nurse leader must communicate information about delegation to the licensed nurses and UAP and educate them about what responsibilities can be delegated. This information should include the competencies of delegatees who can safely perform a specific nursing responsibility. Rationale: Licensed nurses must be aware of the competence level of staff and expectations for delegation (as described within the policies and procedures) in order to make informed decisions on whether or not delegation is appropriate for the given situation. Licensed nurses maintain accountability for the patient. However, the delegatee has responsibility for the delegated activity, skill, or procedure. 5. All delegatees must demonstrate knowledge and competency on how to perform a delegated responsibility. Therefore, the employer/nurse leader is responsible for providing access to training and education specific to the delegated responsibilities. This applies to all RNs, LPN/VNs, and UAP who will be delegatees. Competency validation should follow education and competency testing should be kept on file. Competency must be periodically evaluated to ensure continued competency. The conVolume 7/Issue 1 April 2016

www.journalofnursingregulation.com

9

text and processes associated with competency validation will be different for each activity, skill, or procedure being delegated. Competency validation should be specific to the knowledge and skill needed to safely perform the delegated responsibility as well as to the level of practitioner (i.e., RN, LPN/VN, UAP) to whom the activity, skill, or procedure has been delegated. Rationale: This ensures that competency of the delegatee is determined not only at the beginning of the delegation process, but on an ongoing basis, as well. 6. The nurse leader responsible for delegation, along with other nurse leaders and administrators within the facility, must periodically evaluate the delegation process. The licensed nurse and/or his or her manager (if applicable) must report any incidences to the nurse leader responsible for delegation. A decision should be made about corrective action, including whether further education and training are needed or whether that individual should not be allowed to perform a specific delegated responsibility. Rationale: Patient safety should always be the priority for a health care setting. If any compromises in care are noted, immediate action must be taken. Gravlin and Bittner (2010) identified that evaluation of the effectiveness of the delegation process and resolution of any issues is critical to delegation. 7. The employer/nurse leader must promote a positive culture and work environment for delegation. Rationale: A positive culture nurtures effective communication and collaboration in order to create an environment supportive of patientdirected care. Licensed Nurse Responsibilities

Any decision to delegate a nursing responsibility must be based on the needs of the patient or population, the stability and predictability of the patient’s condition, the documented training and competence of the delegatee, and the ability of the licensed nurse to supervise the delegated responsibility and its outcome, with special consideration to the available staff mix and patient acuity. Additionally, the licensed nurse must consider the state/jurisdiction’s provisions for delegation and the employer’s policies and procedures prior to making a final decision to delegate. Licensed nurses must be aware that delegation is at the nurse’s discretion, with consideration of the particular situation. The licensed nurse maintains accountability for the patient, while the delegatee is responsible for the delegated activity, skill, or procedure. If, under the circumstances, a nurse does not feel it is appropriate to delegate a certain responsibility to a delegatee, the delegating nurse should perform the activity him/herself. 1. The licensed nurse must determine when and what to delegate based on the practice setting, the patients’ needs and condition, the state/jurisdiction’s provisions for delegation, and the employer policies and procedures regarding delegating a specific responsibility. The licensed nurse must determine the needs of the patient and whether those needs are matched by the knowledge, skills, and abilities of the delegatee and can be performed safely by the delegatee. The licensed nurse cannot delegate any activity that requires clinical reasoning, nursing judgment, or critical decision making. The licensed nurse must ultimately make the final decision whether an activity is appropriate to delegate to the delegatee based on the Five Rights of Delegation (National Council of State Boards of Nursing, 1995, 1996). See Table 1 for the description of the Five Rights of Delegation. Rationale: The licensed nurse, who is present at the point of care, is in the best position to assess the needs of the patient and what can or cannot be delegated in specific situations. 2. The licensed nurse must communicate with the delegatee who will be assisting in providing patient care. This should include reviewing the delegatee’s assignment and discussing delegated responsibilities, including information on the patient’s condition/stability, any specific information pertaining to a certain patient (e.g., no blood draws in the right arm), and any specific information about the patient’s condition that should be communicated back to the licensed nurse by the delegatee. Rationale: Communication must be a two-way process involving both the licensed nurse delegating the activity and the delegatee being delegated the responsibility. Evidence shows that the better the communication between the nurse and the delegatee, the more optimal the outcome (Corazzini, Anderson, Mueller, Hunt-McKinney et al., 2013). The licensed nurse must provide information about the patient and care requirements. This includes any specific issues related to any delegated responsibilities. These instructions should include any unique patient requirements. The licensed nurse must instruct the delegatee to regularly communicate the status of the patient. 3. The licensed nurse must be available to the delegatee for guidance and questions, including assisting with the delegated responsibility, if necessary, or performing it him/herself if the patient’s condition or other circumstances warrant doing so. 10

Journal of Nursing Regulation

Rationale: Delegation calls for nursing judgment throughout the process. The final decision to delegate rests in the hands of the licensed nurse as he or she has overall accountability for the patient. 4. The licensed nurse must follow up with the delegatee and the patient after the delegated responsibility has been completed. Rationale: The licensed nurse who delegates the “responsibility” maintains overall accountability for the patient, while the delegatee is responsible for the delegated activity, skill, or procedure. 5. The licensed nurse must provide feedback information about the delegation process and any issues regarding delegatee competence level to the nurse leader. Licensed nurses in the facility need to communicate, to the nurse leader responsible for delegation, any issues arising related to delegation and any individual that they identify as not being competent in a specific responsibility or unable to use good judgment and decision making. Rationale: This will allow the nurse leader responsible for delegation to develop a plan to address the situation. Delegatee Responsibilities

Everyone is responsible for the well-being of patients. While the nurse is ultimately accountable for the overall care provided to a patient, the delegatee shares the responsibility for the patient and is fully responsible for the delegated activity, skill, or procedure. 1. The delegatee must accept only the delegated responsibilities that he or she is appropriately trained and educated to perform and feels comfortable doing given the specific circumstances in the health care setting and patient’s condition. The delegatee should confirm acceptance of the responsibility to carry out the delegated activity. If the delegatee does not believe he or she has the appropriate competency to complete the delegated responsibility, then the delegatee should not accept the delegated responsibility. This includes informing the hospital leadership if he or she does not feel he or she has received adequate training to perform the delegated responsibility, is not performing the procedure frequently enough to do it safely, or his or her knowledge and skills need updating. Rationale: The delegatee shares the responsibility to keep patients safe and this includes only performing activities, skills, or procedures in which he or she is competent and comfortable doing. 2. The delegatee must maintain competency for the delegated responsibility. Rationale: Competency is an ongoing process. Even if properly taught, the delegatee may become less competent if he or she does not frequently perform the procedure. Given that the delegatee shares the responsiblity for the patient, the delegatee also has a responsibility to maintain competency. 3. The delegatee must communicate with the licensed nurse in charge of the patient. This includes any questions related to the delegated responsibility and follow-up on any unusual incidents that may have occurred while the delegatee was performing the delegated responsibility, any concerns about a patient’s condition, and any other information important to the patient’s care. Rationale: The delegatee is a partner in providing patient care. He or she is interacting with the patient/family and caring for the patient. This information and two-way communication is important for successful delegation and optimal outcomes for the patient. 4. Once the delegatee verifies acceptance of the delegated responsibility, the delegatee is accountable for carrying out the delegated responsibility correctly and completing timely and accurate documentation per facility policy. The delegatee cannot delegate to another individual. If the delegatee is unable to complete the responsibility or feels as though he or she needs assistance, the delegatee should inform the licensed nurse immediately so the licensed nurse can assess the situation and provide support. Only the licensed nurse can determine if it is appropriate to delegate the activity to another individual. If at any time the licensed nurse determines he or she needs to perform the delegated responsibility, the delegatee must relinquish responsibility upon request of the licensed nurse. Rationale: Only a licensed nurse can delegate. In addition, because they are responsible, they need to provide direction, determine who is going to carry out the delegated responsibility, and assist or perform the responsibility him/herself, if he or she deems that appropriate under the given circumstances.

Volume 7/Issue 1 April 2016

www.journalofnursingregulation.com

11

References

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. (2015). Patient safety primers: Handoffs and signouts. Retrieved from www.psnet.ahrq.gov/primer. aspx?primerID=9 American Diabetes Association. (2008). Diabetes care tasks at school: What key personnel need to know. Retrieved from www.diabetes.org/livingwith-diabetes/parents-and-kids/diabetes-care-at-school/school-stafftrainings/diabetes-care-tasks.html ANA. Code of ethics for nurses with interpretive statements. Silver Spring, MD: Nursebooks.org, 2015. Anthony, M. K., & Vidal, K. (2010). Mindful communication: A novel approach to improving delegation and increasing patient safety. The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 15(2). Bittner, N. P., & Gravlin, G. (2009). Critical thinking, delegation, and missed care in nursing practice. JONA, 39(3), 142–146. Budden, J. (2011). The first national survey of medication aides. Journal of Nursing Regulation, 2(3), 4–12. Corazzini, K. N., Anderson, R. A., Rapp, C. G., Mueller, C., McConnell, E. S., & Lekan, D. (2010). Delegation in long-term care: Scope of practice or job description? The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 15(2). doi:10.3912/OJIN.Vol15No02Man04 Corazzini, K. N., Anderson, R. A., Mueller, C., Hunt-McKinney, S., Day, L., & Porter, K. (2013). Understanding RN and LPN patterns of practice in nursing homes. Journal of Nursing Regulation, 4(1), 14–18. Corazzini, K. N., Anderson, R. A., Mueller, C., McConnell, E. S., Landerman, L. R., Thorpe, J. M., & Short, N. M. (2011). Regulation of LPN scope of practice in long-term care. Journal of Nursing Regulation, 2(2), 30–36. Corazzini, K. N., Anderson, R. A., Mueller, C., Thorpe, J. M., & McConnell, E. S. (2013). Licensed practical nurse scope of practice and quality of nursing home care. Nursing Research, 62(5), 315–324. Damgaard, G., & Young, L. (2014). Virtual nursing care for school children with diabetes. Journal of Nursing Regulation, 4(4), 15–24. Gravlin, G., & Bittner, N. P. (2010). Nurses’ and nursing assistants’ reports of missed care and delegation. JONA, 40(7/8), 329–335. Jenkins, B., & Joyner, J. (2013). Preparation, roles, and perceived effectiveness of unlicensed assistive personnel. Journal of Nursing Regulation, 4(3), 33–39. Kalisch, B. J. (2011). The impact of RN-UAP relationships on quality and safety. Nursing Management, 42(9), 16–22. McMullen, T. L., Resnick, B., Chin-Hansen, J., Geiger-Brown, J. M., Miller, N., & Rubenstein, R. (2015). Certified nurse aide scope of practice: State-by-state differences in allowable delegated activities. Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, 16(1), 20–24. Mitty, E., Resnick, B., Allen, J., Bakerjian, D., Hertz, J., Gardner, W., … Mezey, M. (2010). Nursing delegation and medication administration in assisted living. Nursing Administration Quarterly, 34(2), 162– 171. Mueller, C., Anderson, R. A., McConnell, E. S., & Corazzini, K. (2012). Licensed nurse responsibilities in nursing homes: A scope-of-practice issue. Journal of Nursing Regulation, 3(1), 13–20. Mueller, C., & Vogelsmeier, A. (2013). Effective delegation: Understanding responsibility, authority, and accountability. Journal of Nursing Regulation, 4(3), 20–27. National Council of State Boards of Nursing. (1996). Delegation: Concepts and decision-making process. National Council of State Boards of Nursing 1996 Annual Meeting Business Book. National Council of State Boards of Nursing. (1995). Delegation decisionmaking process. National Council of State Boards of Nursing 1995 Annual Meeting Business Book.

12

Journal of Nursing Regulation

Saccomano, S. J., & Pinto-Zipp, G. (2011). Registered nurse leadership style and confidence in delegation. Journal of Nursing Management, 19, 522–533. Young, L., & Damgaard, G. (2015). Transitioning the virtual nursing care for school children with diabetes study to a sustainable model of nursing care. Journal of Nursing Regulation, 6(2), 4–9.

Expert Panel The National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) wishes to thank the members of the expert panel that developed the National Delegation Guidelines. The members of the panel include: Maryann Alexander, PhD, RN, FAAN, Chief Officer, Nursing Regulation, NCSBN. Roberta Connelley, RN, Board Member, Louisiana State Board of Practical Nurse Examiners. Kirsten Corazzini, PhD, FGSA, Associate Professor, Duke University School of Nursing. Susan Gardiner, BSN, RN, LNHA, Association Coordinator, Illinois Nursing Home Administrators Association. Janet Haebler, MSN, RN, Senior Associate Director of State Government Affairs, American Nurses Association (ANA). Pamela Hagan, MSN, RN, APRN, Education and Practice Consultant, Kentucky Board of Nursing. Qiana Hampton, MBA, MHRM, Coordinator, Regulatory Innovations, NCSBN. Jane Clare Joyner, MSN, RN, JD, Senior Policy Fellow for Health Systems and Regulatory Policy, ANA. Cathy Nelson Krewer, MS, RN, Senior Director of Clinical Services, LeadingAge Illinois. MT Meadows, DNP, RN, MBA, CENP, Executive Director (AONE Foundation), Director of Professional Practice (AONE). Ottamissiah Moore, LPN, BS, LPN, Member, District of Columbia Board of Nursing. Christine Mueller, PhD, RN, FGSA, FAAN, Professor, University of Minnesota School of Nursing. Susan Richmond, MSN, RN, Content Manager, Interactive Services, NCSBN. Elena Siegel, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor, UC Davis – The Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing. Josephine H. Silvestre, MSN, RN, Associate, Regulatory Innovations, NCSBN. Nancy Spector, PhD, RN, FAAN, Director, Regulatory Innovations, NCSBN. Kimberly Seaman, BS, RN, MHA, 2nd Vice President, Illinois Nursing Home Administrators Association. Laurie Talarico, MSN, RN, NP, Nursing Practice Coordinator, Massachusetts Board of Registration in Nursing. Alison Trinkoff, ScD, RN, MPH, FAAN, Professor, University of Maryland School of Nursing. Amy Vogelsmeier, PhD, RN, Associate Professor, University of Missouri Health - Sinclair School of Nursing. Linda Young, MS, RN, FRE, Nursing Program Specialist, South Dakota Board of Nursing. After being developed, the guidelines were vetted by the state boards of nursing and national nursing leaders across the United States. They were approved by the NCSBN Board of Directors.

Posttest National Guidelines for Nursing Delegation Objectives Understand evidence-based, stateof-the-art standards for delegation. ⦁ Explain the differences between assignment and delegation and the responsibilities of the employer, nurse leader, delegating nurse, and delegatee in the process of delegation. ⦁

Ce CE Posttest If you reside in the United States and wish to obtain 1.0 contact hour of continuing education (CE) credit, please review these instructions. Instructions Go online to take the posttest and earn CE credit: Members – www.ncsbninteractive. org (no charge) Nonmembers – www.learningext. com ($15 processing fee) If you cannot take the posttest online, complete the print form and mail it to the address (nonmembers must include a check for $15, payable to NCSBN) included at bottom of form. Provider accreditation The NCSBN is accredited as a provider of CE by the Alabama State Board of Nursing. The information in this CE does not imply endorsement of any product, service, or company referred to in this activity.

Please circle the correct answer. 1. Which statement about delegation is correct? a. Nurses are accountable for predicting adverse outcomes. b. Unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP) must accept any delegated nursing activity. c. UAP work under the license of the delegating nurse. d. Nurses cannot delegate any element of the nursing process. 2. Which of the following is NOT one of the Five Rights of Delegation? a. Right reason b. Right person c. Right task d. Right communication 3. What two factors help ensure optimal outcomes in delegation? a. Communication and collaboration b. Licensure and experience c. Training and authorization d. Certification and endorsement 4. Which statement about regulation and scope of practice is correct? a. Any licensed nurse can delegate and supervise unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP). b. Only registered nurses can delegate and supervise UAP. c. All states prohibit licensed practical/ vocational nurses (LPN/VNs) from delegating and supervising. d. Some states prohibit LPN/VNs from delegating and supervising UAP.

5. Which factor can have a negative impact on delegation? a. Shortage of training programs for unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP) b. Variation in roles and responsibilities of UAP c. Inconsistent use of a decision tree for delegation d. Lack of standardized patient handoffs 6. Which statement about members of the nursing team and delegation is correct? a. Unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP) can delegate to other UAP. b. Licensed practical/vocational nurses (LPN/VNs) can delegate to registered nurses (RNs) and UAP. c. RNs can delegate to advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs), LPN/VNs, and UAP. d. APRNs can delegate to RNs, LPN/VNs, and UAP. 7. Allowing persons to perform a specific nursing activity, skill, or procedure that is outside the traditional role and basic responsibilities of the delegatee's current job is the definition for which of the following terms? a. Supervision b. Delegation c. Responsibility d. Accountability 8. The nurse asks the unlicensed assistive personnel to measure blood pressure, temperature, pulse, and respirations. This is an example of: a. Delegation b. Supervision c. Assignment d. Authorization 9. Who is ultimately accountable for the outcome of the delegation? a. The health care provider b. The health care employer c. The nurse leader d. The nurse who delegates the activity

Contact hours: 1.0 Posttest passing score is 75%. Expiration: April 2019

Volume 7/Issue 1  April 2016

www.journalofnursingregulation.com

13

10. Which of the following is NOT a responsibility of the employer and/or nurse leader involving delegation? a. Ensuring appropriate policies and procedures regarding delegation are in place b. Ensuring adequate staffing c. Establishing scope of practice guidelines for unlicensed assistive personnel d. Promoting and maintaining a positive culture 11. The nurse evaluates a patient’s condition and determines that it is inappropriate to delegate a nursing activity to the unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP). What should the nurse do next? a. Ask the UAP to observe and learn how to perform the skill b. Perform the activity himself or herself c. Contact the nursing supervisor d. Consult another nurse 12. How does the nurse supervise a delegated activity? a. By observing the delegatee perform the activity b. By encouraging autonomy, creativity, and self-discipline c. By providing support, guidance, and instructions d. By assessing the staff member’s knowledge, skills, and abilities

Evaluation Form (required) 1. Rate your achievement of each objective from 5 (high/excellent) to 1 (low/poor). • Understand evidence-based, stateof-the-art standards for delegation.

1 2 3 4 5 • Explain the differences between assignment and delegation and the responsibilities of the employer, nurse leader, delegating nurse, and delegatee in the process of delegation.

1 2 3 4 5

• Were the methods of presentation (text, tables, figures, etc.) effective? 1 2 3 4 5 • Was the content relevant to the objectives? 1 2 3 4 5 • Was the article useful to you in your work? 1 2 3 4 5 • Was there enough time allotted for this activity? 1 2 3 4 5 Comments:

2. Rate each of the following items from 5 (very effective) to 1 (ineffective): • Were the authors knowledgeable about the subject? 1 2 3 4 5

Please print clearly Name Mailing address Street City State Zip Home phone Business phone Fax E-mail Method of payment (check one box)

□ Member (no charge) □ Nonmembers (must include a check for $15 payable to NCSBN) PLEASE DO NOT SEND CASH. Mail completed posttest, evaluation form, registration form, and payment to:

NCSBN 111 East Wacker Drive Suite 2900 Chicago, IL 60601-4277 Please allow 4 to 6 weeks for processing.

14

Journal of Nursing Regulation